Slip 4. Page 1. Recto

Dublin Core

Title

Slip 4. Page 1. Recto

Subject

Recipe or Medicine for Laxative absorbant mixture.
alt text on image Postlip Paper Mill

Description

Laxative absorbant mixture
Put one dram of magnesia alba in a mortar
with 10 or 12 grains of the best Turkey rhubarb
and add to them 3 ounces of common Water; simple
cinnamon water & syrup of sugar, of each one
ounce.
As most diseases of Infants are accompanied
with acidities, this mixture may either be given with
a anti -acid to correct these, or to open the body
a table Spoon may be taken - for a dose & repeated
three times a day- So for a very young Child half
a spoonful will be sufficient.
When the mixture is intended to purge
the dose may be increased or the quantity
of rhubarb doubled.
This is one of the most generally useful 
medicines for Children with which I am aquainted

Creator

Charlotte Starkie

Publisher

Gillespie Family

Date

1782 to 1808

Rights

Site licence

Format

Handwritten loose item written on slightly blue paper.
The sheet is Watermarked- Durham & Co.

Language

English

Type

Paper Document

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

Laxative absorbant mixture
Put one dram of magnesia alba in a mortar with 10 or 12 grains of the best Turkey rhubarb and add to them 3 ounces of common Water; simple cinnamon water & syrup of sugar, of each one ounce.
As most diseases of Infants are accompanied with acidities, this mixture may either be given with a anti-acid to correct these, or to open the body a table Spoon may be taken - for a dose & repeated
three times a day- So for a very young Child half a spoonful will be sufficient.
When the mixture is intended to purge the dose may be increased or the quantity of rhubarb doubled.
This is one of the most generally useful medicines for Children with which I am aquainted
We have some information about the paper production used in this slip. The illustration below shows this watermark and dates it to 1790 but the coat of arms is absent so presumably this is a cut half sheet.
alt text on image

William Mustoe of Postlip Mill, in his will (7) made 8 April 1698, described himself as a miller. Neither his inventory (8) or that of a later William Musto (miller) of Postlip (9) give any indication of. paper making, however as late as 1722 a Mr. Nusto was at Postlip (10); in 1726 Mr. Durham was paying rates at Coates, possibly for a house, and in 1728 for Upper Mill as well. (11)
The Winchcombe parish registers show that William, son of John and Lidia Durham of Coates was buried 20 October 1725. Tn 1752 (12) John Durham gave expert evidence that he was 'acqainted with the manner and methods .., of manufacture and ... hath been for upwards of 33 years ... and before that was apprentice‘. This suggests that John Durham became a papermaker in 1719 after an apprenticeship. Where he was prior to 1719 or between then and 1725 is unknown. . In 1733 it was reported ‘the Annual Feast will be kept at Winchcombe ... by Mr. John Durham and Comp. of Postlip Hall, for entertaining all the Servants belonging to the Paper-Works, erected by the said Mr. Durham etc... according to the Yearly usual Custom ...‘ (13).
By 1734 Mr.Durham was paying rates on Upper (SP 008271) and Lower Mills (SP 018277), as well as on the property at Coates (11) and in l745 on Middle Mill (SP 013272) in addition. At this point it is worth pointing out that Middle Mill and Lower Mill were actually in the hamlet of Coates rather than Postlip and this hamlet extended along the River Isbourne up to Castle Street, so that as late as 1872 Coates Mill was in Castle Street, very near to the Sudeley Mill.
In 1746 accounts of the overseers (11) includes the signature of John Durham.
In the 1752 court previously referred to (12) evidence was given by both John Durham and also John Burnham, papermaker of Postlip. References to John Burnham occur at various dates between 1760 and 1780 (1%). In his will he described himself as a stationer and left much of his property to his friend William Durham. (15) . Examination of parish registers, wills and other records enable us to build up a family tree for the Durhams (Fig.2) but where the first John Durham came from is not certain, though it may have been from Willersey. He died in 1760 and was followed by his son William Durham. William seems to have had his brother-in-law Thomas Merryman as a partner for a period and in 1763 they jointly insured (16) various buildings etc. describing themselves as ‘paper- makers, millers and maltsters‘. William appears alone in a later policy (17) and later still he is replaced by a William junior (18) papermaker, although William senior was still alive (19). These fire insurance policies are of particular interest since they detail the buildings involved.
A William Durham of Postlip, papermaker, maltster and farmer, took as partner James Stevens, of the same place, papermaker, by an indenture made 14 February 1783 (20) and there is a later reference (21) to ‘one of the most considerable paper manufactories ... Messrs. Durham and Stevens‘ as well as ‘Fine writing paper is made at Postlip, Quenington and Abbenhall‘. Perhaps this James Stevens is the J. Stevens who was interested in a paper mill at Rodmore (S0 581027). In 1796, John Durham of Coates, papermaker,made his will giving ‘unto my father William Durham the Elder, late of Postlip ... now of Newnham ... all my person-als‘. This John died in 1799 and apparently William senior resumed control of the mills since he wrote a letter from Postlip, 17 March 1799 regarding laying mills still to keep down the price of rags.
Reference:
F.J.T. Harris & J.L.Angel. A HISTORY OF PAPER MAKING IN AND NEAR WINCHCOMBE, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, ENGLAND. Gloucestershire Society for Industrial Archaeology Journal pages 9-65. 1975.

Original Format

Paper document

Files

laxative absorbant.jpg

Citation

Charlotte Starkie, “Slip 4. Page 1. Recto,” The Huntroyd Receipts, accessed October 28, 2020, https://huntroyd.co.uk/items/show/133.

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